Question of the Day: Do you believe political advocacy is important for anesthesiology?

Advocating for the specialty of anesthesiology continues to be a topic of discussion among this year’s ANESTHESIOLOGY 2019 attendees. This prompted the ASA Daily News staff to ask:

Do you believe political advocacy is important for anesthesiology? How do you advocate or plan to advocate for the specialty?

Emmett Whitaker, M.D.

Emmett Whitaker, M.D.
Jericho, Vermont

It’s important. I’ve been going to the ANESTHESIOLOGY meeting since I was a second-year resident. It’s extremely important to be involved at the local and national level to ensure that we continue to provide safe care for our patients. I’ve written letters to legislators regarding maintaining safe anesthesia care for patients.

Rachel Kozinn, M.D.

Rachel Kozinn, M.D.
Dallas, Texas

As residents, we are a part of the Texas Society of Anesthesiologists. Many of my fellow residents have contributed their time for advocacy. We go to the Capital once a year, and I plan to go for the first time next year. Two of my colleagues are delegates.

John McGroarty, M.D., M.S.

John McGroarty, M.D., M.S.
Melbourne Beach, Florida

It’s extremely important, and I donate to the PAC and keep up on the ASA’s advocacy news. Some of my partners have met with our local representatives on behalf of the specialty.

Nawreen Jahan

Nawreen Jahan
Tampa, Florida

When I think of advocacy, I think of patients, not necessarily politics or supporting certain policies. I think that’s where advocacy starts. It starts with wanting better for your patients. In anesthesiology, we can advocate for better insurance and a better system that offers equal opportunity to health care regardless of gender or socio-economic status. That’s how we should be using our resources. So as a student, that’s where my focus is now.

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